A twin of the mysterious ninth planet of the solar system has been discovered

A twin of the mysterious ninth planet of the solar system has been discovered

Astronomers have discovered a possible twin of the mysterious ninth planet of the solar system, located 336 light years from Earth. This object is comparable in size with Jupiter and 11 times its mass, and its orbit is located very far from the parent stars.

Scientists have discovered the exoplanet, which is located at a great distance from the binary star HD 106906 and the ring of ice debris. In the solar system, a similar ring is called the Kuiper Belt and is located beyond the orbit of Neptune. The gas giant formed with the star 15 million years ago, indicating that the ninth planet could have arisen at the dawn of the solar system 4.6 billion years ago.

The exoplanet is extremely far away from a pair of young stars, and the distance is more than 730 times that of Earth from the Sun. This makes it difficult to calculate the parameters of the orbit, which turned out to be elongated and inclined. Scientists believe that the reason was that the planet originally migrated closer to the binary star, after which it was almost thrown out of the system due to the gravitational effect. A passing star managed to stabilize the orbit of the gas giant.

Astronomers believe that a similar scenario could play out in the case of the ninth planet of the solar system. It could have formed in the inner part of the solar system and been ejected from it as a result of interaction with Jupiter, after which its orbit was stabilized by the gravitational field of passing stars.