Astronomers discover giant South Pole Wall in space

10 months ago

Its densest part lies in the direction of the South Pole of the Earth, which is why the structure got its name.

Astronomer Daniel Pomard from the University of Paris-Saclay noticed a giant filamentary structure behind the Laniakey supercluster, which was called the South Pole Wall, reports ZN.

The size of this structure is comparable to the Sloan Great Wall – the third largest complex of superclusters of galaxies known in the Universe today.

Over the past 40 years, it has become known that galaxies in the Universe do not exist autonomously, but are combined into larger structures. Thus, the Milky Way, together with the Andromeda galaxy, the Triangulum galaxy and their satellites, are part of the Local Group, and that, in turn, into the Virgo supercluster, which is attracted to the gravitational anomaly in the center of Laniakea called the Great Attractor. And the Great Attractor itself is attracted by the much more massive Shapley supercluster, towards which our galaxy is heading at a speed of 660 kilometers per second.

Now Pomarad talked about the discovery of the South Pole Wall. Its densest part lies in the direction of the South Pole of the Earth, which is why the structure got its name. The light from it goes to us for 500 million years. The structure lies just behind the Laniakei supercluster and occupies about 200 degrees of arc on the ecliptic – more than a semicircle – extending far into the northern sky.

The northern part of the South Pole Wall bends and approaches the Milky Way at a distance, from where light has been traveling for about 300 million light-years. At the same time, the authors are not sure that they saw the structure completely, since it was possible to detect it only by the gravitational effect that it exerted on the speed of motion of galaxies studied by astronomers. Direct observations of the object are difficult: it is in a region of the sky that has not been fully explored by instruments, since it is partially hidden by the arms of our own galaxy.

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