Brad Pitt gets joint custody of children after 5-year battle with Angelina Jolie

Brad Pitt has been granted joint child custody with Angelina Jolie. The court’s preliminary ruling comes after nearly five years of complicated litigation between the actors – and it’s not over yet.

Brad Pitt gets joint custody of children after 5-year battle with Angelina Jolie

Judge John Ouderkirk, hired by Pitt, 57, and Jolie, 46, to handle the case, made the decision after months of hearing testimony from people who spent time with the couple’s children, including therapists and caregivers. However, the judge never once called the children themselves to testify – something Jolie mentions in her own court report.

Brad Pitt gets joint custody of children after 5-year battle with Angelina Jolie

“Brad has always looked for opportunities to spend more time with his children and prioritized their well-being,” a source close to the situation told Yahoo. – The judge ruled in his favor and significantly altered his usual routine to allow him time to be with his children.

The ruling affects five of Jolie and Pitt’s six children: 17-year-old Pax, 16-year-old Zahara, 14-year-old Shiloh and 12-year-old twins Vivien and Knox. Their oldest son, Maddox, is 19, so the decision no longer applies to him.

A source close to Jolie tells People that “joint custody is not an issue Angelina objects to, there were other issues of concern, but the court proceedings are closed.”

Jolie filed for divorce from Pitt in 2016 after an argument that occurred while the family was flying on a private plane from France to California. Pitt was accused of hitting Maddox, who was 15 at the time. Two months later, the FBI released a statement saying it had looked into the circumstances surrounding the allegations and would not investigate further.

On Monday, Jolie filed a complaint with the California Second District Court of Appeal against Oderkirk’s decision. She criticized the judge, whom she tried unsuccessfully to remove from the case last year, for refusing to allow her teenage children to speak.