Democracy under attack: U.S. Capitol smashed for the first time since the Anglo-American War

Democracy under attack: U.S. Capitol smashed for the first time since the Anglo-American War

Supporters of Donald Trump stormed the Capitol building and ransacked it. They said that, like their leader, they would not accept the defeat of the incumbent U.S. president in the election.

Police tried to use tear gas, but the crowd literally swept them away and surrounded the Senate chamber, where the votes were being counted, and forbade the senators to leave the room. Vice President Mike Pence was hastily evacuated from the building, and police were forced to use guns. The victim was one of the protesters: a girl was shot on the steps of the stairs. Demonstrators fought with the police and beat the equipment of journalists, saying that the media is the enemy of the people.

Donald Trump tweeted a message to supporters urging them to disperse, “I understand your pain and concern. This election was stolen from us. But please support the Capitol Police and law enforcement. They are working for the good of our country. Let the protest remain peaceful. Respect the law and our great women and men of law enforcement. We need peace, so – go home.”

But the head of state’s calls may not have been heard. Because social media blocked his accounts for hours because they “violated community policy.” The mayor of Washington imposed a curfew, and protesters left Capitol Hill before the curfew. The congressional session did continue.

Journalists noted that this was the first time since the Anglo-American War that the Capitol had been attacked. Then, in 1814, the British, trying to defend America as their colony, burned many government buildings. This included the White House.