Greenland ice melt could cause sea level to rise 7.5 inches by 2100

Greenland ice melt could cause sea level to rise 7.5 inches by 2100

A new study led by scientists from the Universities of Liège and Oslo provides the latest climate models that predict 60 percent more melting of the Greenland ice sheet than previously thought. This is important data that shows the future of the climate, according to a Nature Communications article.

The Greenland Ice Sheet, the second largest after the Antarctic, covers 1.7 million square kilometers. Its complete melting could cause ocean levels to rise as much as 23 feet. Although we haven’t reached that point yet, previous scenarios predicted by climate models have just been revised upward — melting the island’s ice will raise sea levels to 7.5 inches by 2100.

Previously, the rise was thought to be 4.1 inches.

Greenland ice melt could cause sea level to rise 7.5 inches by 2100

The team from the Climate Science Laboratory was the first to update the scenario of the future of the Greenland ice cap. Further research will be carried out as part of the European PROTECT project (H2020). The goal of this project is to assess and predict changes in the Earth’s cryosphere with fully quantified uncertainties in order to produce reliable global, regional and local predictions of sea level rise at different timescales.