House of Representatives votes to increase payments to $2,000 per person

House of Representatives votes to increase payments to $2,000 per person

Whether the Senate will support President Trump’s demand is unknown

Democrats in the US Congress voted to increase direct payments to the public from $600 to $2,000, which President Donald Trump had earlier demanded. Whether the upper house of Congress will support the bill is unknown.

Democrats in the US Congress on Monday are trying to push for an increase in direct payments to the public from $600 to $2,000, which President Donald Trump had earlier demanded.

On the previous day, President Trump, who had threatened to block the economic aid package due to the coronavirus, suddenly reversed his position and signed the bill, thereby ensuring the resumption of payments to millions of unemployed Americans and preventing a partial government shutdown.

The news was greeted with enthusiasm by world markets. Leading Wall Street indices reached record highs on Monday.

The Democrats, who hold the majority of seats in the House of Representatives, have long wanted to increase the $2,000 payment and now hope to push the proposal through or at least put the Republicans in a situation where they will be forced to openly oppose the initiative.

The vote is expected to start in the afternoon and last until this evening. Lawmakers will also try to overcome Trump’s recent veto of the $740 billion defence budget bill. If successful, this will be the first time they have overridden a veto in Trump’s entire presidency.

The president himself is currently at his golf resort in Florida and does not appear in public.

President-elect Joe Biden, meanwhile, issued a brief statement after a meeting with national security and foreign policy teams. He said that Trump’s aides were obstructing his transition team.

Many of the Republicans under whose control the Senate is, do not support an increase in payments.

Georgia Republican senators Kelly Leffler and David Perdue, who face a crucial Senate run-off next month, welcomed Trump’s decision to sign the bill, but did not say whether they thought the pay increases were necessary.