New York high school held a porn literacy class without their parents’ knowledge

3 weeks ago

A porn literacy lesson, conducted without warning to students and informing parents, took place for first-year (16-17 year old) students at Columbia University’s gymnasium and preparatory school, The New York Post reported May 22

New York high school held a porn literacy class without their parents' knowledge

The school is a preparatory school for admission to Columbia University, and it costs parents $47,000 a year to attend.

The class, “Literacy in Porn: Cross Emphasis on Mainstream Porn,” was taught to 120 students of both genders (some attended in person, others through Zoom). According to the New York Post, it was taught by Justine Ang Fonte, director of health and well-being at another elite Dalton Preparatory School.

The presentation, portions of which were viewed by a New York Post reporter, included images of partially nude women (some related), discussions of the “orgasm gap” between heterosexual women and LGBT people (it was claimed that the latter experienced orgasm more often). Students were also explained what popular search terms on pornographic sites meant, such as “stepmother” and “anal,” and shown examples of different “genres” of porn.

Another section included a lesson on “competitive OnlyFans,” a growingly popular subscription service where people, mostly women, offer their own obscene or pornographic photos and videos for a fee. One example given for the “creator” of OnlyFans is someone who identifies herself as “non-binary” but uses the term “girl” to describe herself to help promote her creator’s page.

Parents only found out about the content because some students watched the lesson from home. After all of the students’ parents found out about the content of the lesson, they expressed outrage and complained to school officials. They asked the school authorities for materials from the “pornography” lesson, but were refused.

New York high school held a porn literacy class without their parents' knowledge

One mother told the newspaper that she and other parents were “disappointed with what was going on,” and the lack of a warning or opportunity to opt out of the lesson made her wonder “what else the school is doing.” “Why does porn take priority over physics, art, literature, or poetry in school?” – Another parent was indignant.

After reports of the lesson went public and outrage grew, Dr. William M. Donohue, head of Columbia University’s school, sent an e-mail to parents apologizing and acknowledging that the lesson did not “reflect our philosophy.” “In this case, the speaker was not consistent with our unique mission … and for that I apologize,” he added.

Note that Fonte’s “educator” website states that she “reveled in the destruction of medical education for 10 years” and formulates her “pedagogy through the lens of Kimberle Crenshaw’s teachings on intersectionality.

Crenshaw, 62, is a professor of law at Columbia University and UCLA Law School and one of the first proponents of critical racial theory who coined the term “intersectionality” more than 30 years ago. The term refers to how people’s social identities overlap and how some are disadvantaged by their race, class, gender identity, sexual orientation or religion.

Recall that critical race theory is derived from the critical theory of modern society (Frankfurt School).