The surface of Venus is cracked and moving like ice floating on the ocean

North Carolina State University planetary science professor Paul K. Byrne believes that much of Venus’ fragile upper crust has broken into fragments that are jostling and moving and this may be responsible for the slow churning of the mantle beneath the surface.

He and his team of experts came to this conclusion by using data from a decade-old radar to investigate how Venus’ surface interacts with the planet’s interior.

The surface of Venus is cracked and moving like ice floating on the ocean

Venus has many tectonic landforms. Some of these formations are long, thin belts in which the crust compresses to form ridges, or ruptures to form depressions and furrows. In many of these belts, there is evidence of pieces of crust floating on the surface like ice floes on water.

Researchers have hypothesized that, like Earth’s mantle, Venus’ mantle is swirling with currents, heated by the core. Scientists have modeled the slow but powerful movement of Venus’ mantle and proved that it is powerful enough to fragment the upper crust wherever these low-lying blocks are found. The main question about Venus is whether there are active volcanoes and tectonic faults on the planet today. But no mission to Venus has yet shown that the planet is active, but it cannot be ruled out.