The United States said it supports the people of China in their struggle for human rights on the eve of the anniversary of the suppression of the Tiananmen Square protests.

2 weeks ago
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Secretary of State Anthony Blinken said the country honors the sacrifices made by those who were killed 32 years ago and the brave activists who continue their efforts today in the face of ongoing government repression.

“The United States will continue to support the people of China as they demand that their government respect universal human rights,” Blinken said.

The United States said it supports the people of China in their struggle for human rights on the eve of the anniversary of the suppression of the Tiananmen Square protests.

The secretary of state also called for “transparency” about the events in Tiananmen Square, which implies “a full accounting of all those killed, detained or missing.”

While mainland China is effectively banned from discussing the suppression of peaceful democracy demonstrations in Beijing on June 4, 1989, semi-autonomous Hong Kong has held annual vigils and pro-democracy rallies for the past three decades.

This year, however, the traditional pro-democracy events were cancelled: authorities warned that a new national security law could be enforced against those who violate the ban on protests.

The United States said it supports the people of China in their struggle for human rights on the eve of the anniversary of the suppression of the Tiananmen Square protests.

Secretary of State Anthony Blinken said the country honors the sacrifices made by those who were killed 32 years ago and the brave activists who continue their efforts today in the face of ongoing government repression.

“The United States will continue to support the people of China as they demand that their government respect universal human rights,” Blinken said.

The secretary of state also called for transparency about the events in Tiananmen Square, which implies a full accounting of all those killed, detained or missing.

While mainland China is effectively banned from discussing the suppression of peaceful democracy demonstrations in Beijing on June 4, 1989, semi-autonomous Hong Kong has held annual vigils and pro-democracy rallies for the past three decades.

This year, however, the traditional pro-democracy events were cancelled: the authorities warned that a new national security law could be applied to those who violate the ban on protests.