U.S. foresees years of struggle with the consequences of the attack of “Russian hackers”

U.S. foresees years of struggle with the consequences of the attack of "Russian hackers"

The U.S. predicted years of struggle with the consequences of the attack of “Russian hackers” on the resources of U.S. government agencies. This was stated by the former deputy head of the U.S. National Intelligence Susan Gordon in an interview with CNBC.

“It [the cyberattack] is very bad for national security, it’s bad for the discipline of cybersecurity itself, for the professionals and for the craft. And it’s bad for leadership. Because it means we haven’t been focused enough on this problem at the highest level,” Gordon said. The former deputy intelligence chief stressed that hacking into U.S. government systems was “ungentlemanly.”

According to Gordon, the U.S. could respond to a cyberattack by summoning the Russian ambassador to the State Department or even expelling diplomats. “There are a number of things that need to be done, but those are secondary to the work that organizations and companies have to do to understand what’s going on in their systems and then assess the losses, try to mitigate them. But that’s going to take many years,” she noted.

On December 13, Reuters reported that Russian hackers allegedly attacked the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and gained access to internal communications at the agency. The attack was part of a campaign that also hacked the systems of the U.S. Treasury Department and the National Telecommunications and Information Administration. Moscow rejects accusations of hacking attacks on U.S. agencies and considers them unfounded.