What does Biden’s victory in the U.S. election mean for Canada

After several days of counting the votes, the Associated Press reported that Joe Biden had won the US election.

The election of Biden as President of the United States will have an impact on Canada, writes CTV News.

Biden, unlike former US President Donald Trump, supports immigration. The newly elected president intends to invite highly qualified specialists to the United States. Canada hopes to welcome 1.2 million immigrants over the next 3 years. This means that competition can arise between countries.

Trade

In the past four years, trade has become a stumbling block between the United States and Canada. Ultimately, the countries managed to conclude a new free trade agreement. Experts believe that Biden will not renegotiate the agreement.

The presidential administration will focus on rebuilding supply chains so that the United States does not depend on other countries during the crisis. This can affect Canadian businesses that manufacture export products.

Climate and energy

Biden intends to invest in the development of green technologies. The President said he would join the Paris Agreement and urge other countries to cut emissions. Investing in green infrastructure will help create jobs and restore the economy following the COVID-19 pandemic. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shares Biden’s views.

Biden said he would refuse construction of the Keystone pipeline, which was supposed to transport oil from Alberta to Nebraska.

China and foreign policy

Biden intends to mend relations with allies, whether China is unclear about the allies. Experts believe that Biden will be open to negotiations with China and will not press charges against Huawei’s CFO Meng Wanzhou. If Wanzhou returns to China, China will free Canadians Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, who are accused of espionage.

Stephen Lamy, professor at the University of Southern California, is looking forward to the return of Obama-style diplomacy. Nevertheless, Biden may continue to try to influence Canada to increase defense spending.